Ready Player One Poster

Ready Player One (2018)

Action | SciFi 
Rayting:   7.5/10 373400 votes
Country: USA
Language: English

When the creator of a virtual reality world called the OASIS dies, he releases a video in which he challenges all OASIS users to find his Easter Egg, which will give the finder his fortune.

Movie Trailer

User Reviews

Aaron_Kyle 12 December 2018

Ready Player One is inoffensive enough to be entertaining but gets a bit stupid when thought is put into it.

Ready Player One is a very fun movie with the very experienced Steven Spielberg behind it. Visually its stunting, full of glaring moments and Spielberg-esque choreography and sound. The musical score too is done in a similar fashion, adding to the aesthetic pleasure of the film.

That is when Ready Player One starts to go downhill. The first major issue are the spoon fed pop culture references (especially the 80's) to today's adolescent audience. The film thrives on them and it starts getting overwhelming and annoying after a few.

The second issue is how much watered down the film is from the book. All of the sticking points of book are completely ignored making the books relatively dark narrative feel soft in the film which is almost insultive to the book.

The final major issue is the illogicality of the plot. How is one kid able to find all the answers to the OASIS but a whole company of man and women working together isn't?

Besides from the film being stupid and illogical it still manages to be mostly fun from start to finish is and worth of some praise for it vigorous visuals.

Final Grade: 6/10

MnemonicDevice 16 April 2018

I've noticed quite a few reviews here from book fans complaining that the movie wasn't true to the novel. As a fan of the book, let me just say that's true but it's fine. The overarching story is the same. The fact of the matter is with a nearly 400 page novel packed full of pop culture references, some things would have to be cut to make it onto the big screen. Partially it's an issue of length. Partially it's just the reality that the planets were never going to fully align to allow use of many of the properties from the novel. Yes, I loved the 2112, WarGames, D&D, Joust, et al references from the novel as much as the next person, but still I felt that Spielberg captured the wonder and fun and the story of the novel accurately, even if he did so using different references. The are actually some things I even think were an improvement from the book, especially the way they re-imagined I-R0k. The bottom line is, if you're a book reader, just take this movie for what it is, an alternate version of the story, written by the same person who wrote the novel.

Platypuschow 5 September 2018

There seem to be two camps as far as Ready Player One is concerned, those who have read the books (Who tend to dislike the movie) and those who haven't (Who tend to like the movie). I'm in the latter group and am very thankful for this.

When the trailer came out I was unimpressed and didn't get onboard with the hype at all, yes I was impressed with all the pop culture references and characters but I figured it would be all flash and no substance.

Thankfully I couldn't have been anymore wrong, Read Player One has plenty of substance, emotion and charm and I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it.

Set in a near dystopian world where people use a virtual reality world called the Oasis to escape their lives it tells the story of one player and his efforts participating in a competition that with decide the fate of the entire universe (Oasis).

The plot if fantastic and very well handled, the movie looks like a billion dollars, the cast did a decent enough job and the pop culture references though thick and fast didn't overwhelm the movie like I feared they would.

From Overwatchs Tracer, Streetfighters Chun-Li & Ryu, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Iron Giant, Chucky, Freddy Kreuger, Mortal Kombats Goro, Gundam, Mech-Godzilla, King Kong, and countless more I being a big ol'nerd really appreciated this. Combined with the incredible mostly 80's soundtrack it's a sight to behold.

The movie wrapped up nicely and went in directions I didn't expect, I'm suitably impressed and would love to see more.

If it's very different than the book I understand peoples anger, for me however this was fantastic.

The Good:

Looks amazing

Solid plot and delivery

Pop culture references are charming

The Bad:

Honestly nothing springs to mind

Things I Learnt From This Movie:

I'm still not impressed with Gundam

People CAN swear in Spielberg movies

Old Simon Pegg looks like a tall hobbit

Artemis is the offspring of an elf and a porcupine

ArchStanton1862 20 March 2018

I honestly didn't think that Spielberg had another crowd-pleasing actioner left in him. For the last decade or so his focus has been on more realistic period dramas and character pieces. His attempts at grand action spectacle (the underrated Tintin aside) were underwhelming. But who knew he had this left in him?

This film is an absolute blast. It seamlessly combines reality and animation into one big, exciting adventure. I'm still not completely sure how it pulled it off. I was absolutely amazed at how seamlessly the film merged animation with reality (I'd say only perhaps 1/3 of the film takes place in the "real" world) and gave the obviously digital environments emotional and kinetic weight. That's a very hard balance to pull off and this movie doesn't even raise a sweat. In fact, some of the best scenes revolve around the absurd mix of online and real existence. Pretty much every scene in Sorrento's soulless corporate HQ is a riot because of the seriousness with which they take their involvement in this silly online world, made even more ridiculous by the motions they all make in their VR suits as they react to unseen perils like well-dressed mimes.

I have no doubt that this film will receive a lot of flak for its reliance on pop culture artifacts. And there's some truth to the criticism. The best scene in the movie is when one of the characters waits in an almost meditative trance during the fight scene until he cries out "form of a gundam" in Japanese and awesomeness ensues. Would this scene work as well if it hadn't been a recognizable brand? No question it wouldn't. And that goes for an infinite array of references, from the Iron Giant to the Delorean to an absolutely perfect Overlook Hotel to Chucky ("Oh God, it's f*%@ing Chucky" has got to be the second greatest line in the movie).

But to say that this is nothing but leaching off others' success is unfair. The references are there for a reason. This is a Geek movie, and for geeks this sort of referencing is how they approach the universe. It'd seem odd if there were no open pop culture references in a free-for-all online world. More to the point, the film has a lot to say about online culture and the isolating effect it has on people. The film isn't all pretty colors and film references, it deals with issues like how real the connections we form online actually are, the ever-decreasing distance between fantasy and reality, the importance of community involvement, and all sorts of identity issues that arise when we can hide behind avatars. Not that I'd call the film overly deep or anything, but it's certainly more than just a collection of pop culture references thrown together with minimal plot.

The characters are all good fun. Parzival and his mate Aech are just like a lot of friends I know online, although Parzival's shallowness gives him a good obstacle to overcome. Art3mis is a bit more driven and has goals that take her further than just being the best at a video game. Parzival has a major cyber-crush on her, which is something of a problem. Daito and Shoto are somewhat more distant online rivals. All of them have great moments, but most come after their true selves get revealed around 2/3 of the way through the film. Some of them are very surprising (don't look at the cast list) and they are all funny together. Krennic's director Sorrento is a great villain. He's so full of himself and contemptuous that his appearance in-game as a

mattgosling1987 20 March 2018

Pretty good movie visually and even though the changes from the book are obvious but they don't spoil it. They are changes that have to be made so it translates well on to screen.

The comedy in the film is charming and not over the top. It fits in well with the film.

The visuals are awesome. There are so many Easter eggs and references from pop culture it's unbelievable that they managed to add so many. It'll take a long time to spot them all.

Overall I'd say this film is definitely worth a watch.

DanielRobertRoss 21 March 2018

Spielberg remains to this day one of the most misunderstood film-makers of his generation. He has been labeled both a peddler of popcorn and a saccharine manipulator (Those who say the latter have clearly forgotten Alex Kitner erupting in a geyser of blood in Jaws, exploding Nazi heads, the horrors of the Holocaust in Schindler and the river of corpses in War of the Worlds).

There are two Spielbergs. There's the man who makes somber, academy award winning dramas (Empire of the Sun, Saving Private Ryan, Munich, War Horse, Lincoln etc). Then's there's the 10 year old playing in the sand box (The Indy films, Hook, Jurassic Park, Tintin etc). What I enjoy most about the 'Berg, is how he can zigzag between disparate genres. But after a stretch of SF films (A.I, Minority Report and War of the Worlds), I was looking forward to a return to the free wheeling fun with Crystal Skull. It turned out to be an uncharacteristic dud that despite the boffo box office, proved to be deeply unpopular with fans of the series.

This made me cautious about Ready Player One. Had Spielberg lost his touch? I was wrong. This may be one of the most visually amazing and effortlessly fun films I've seen in a long time. I have not read Ernest Cline's novel, so fans of the popular novel may have issues, but I rarely read the books before seeing the film.

The cast are great. Tye Sheridan are Olivia Cooke are the standouts. Mark Rylance and Simon Pegg are fun in supporting roles. Alan Silvestri's robust score is one of his most memorable. I miss John Williams, but it's still a great score. Longtime 'Berg collaborator Janusz Kaminski's cinematography is beautiful. And it's the only film where you'll see a DeLorean chasing a T-Rex on the big screen. That image alone is worth the ticket price. He never went away, but it's nice to see him back playing in the sand box.

juanceballos1 1 April 2018

I personally did not read the book prior to watching this movie. I did not go into the theater with preconceived ideas or expectations. With that being said, I was not disappointed at all. Most of the negative reviews this movie is getting is from raging nerds who say it's not as good as the book (are they ever)?) This is a great and entertaining movie, I absolutely recommend ignoring the raging nerds and go watch it.

fredemt 1 April 2018

I went to see this movie with my boyfriend. I had read the book and he hadn't.

Let me start with saying to all those people who say that people who've read the books are whining that my boyfriend didn't like the movie whatsoever. Yes there are a couple of cool scenes. Yes there are some funny jokes. Yes the CGI looks amazing.

But oh my lord what happened?

What happened to all the smart dialogue and puzzle solving? What happened to the cool and funny references? And oh my god what happened to the plot?

I'm aware that it can be difficult to transfer a book to a movie but come on. Nothing besides the characters names were similar to the book. The plot is very Hollywood and stiff.

It's nothing you haven't seen before. Hollywood unfortunately got the best of this one.

Pjtaylor-96-138044 2 April 2018

'Ready Player One (2018)' should have been called 'The Pop-Culture Movie', since it is so chock-full of blatant references and call-backs to media, from the eighties and nineties in particular. It seems as though this over-reliance on pre-existing material, along with its recognition and nostalgic value, is the driving force behind most of the narrative, being that the flick itself doesn't capture the spirit of the films it intends to ape, and so often calls out by name to cringe-worthy results, but instead shoves in reference after soulless reference in a vapid attempt to prey on its audience's ability to recognise things they've seen before. This 'nostalgia vampirism' is meant to evoke memories of better films and have those emotions transposed onto this one, though it only succeeds in the former and reminds you how much you'd rather watch any of those than this. It's evocative of the larger issues that plague the flick, those being that it doesn't have any real stakes or ability to engage on its own and also treats its audience as rather dumb and forces expository dialogue down their throats at every opportunity. The on-the-nose exposition was honesty some of the most intense and grating I'd experienced in some time. The feature did have some nice visual effects and I cared about the digital 'avatars' as much as any of their real-world counter-parts, though only to a certain degree, but so much was happening that it was hard to register at times due to the odd colour palette and heavily contrasting character designs. It didn't have a cohesive aesthetic, to say the least. It did have a good score by Alan Silvestri and some of its allegorical undertones certainly ring true. I honestly wasn't entertained, though, despite all the visual splendour and things that should appeal directly to me, and that really tells you all you need to know. For all the throw-away movie references, where was the fun of 'Raiders Of The Lost Ark (1981)'? Where was the wonder of 'E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)', the suspense of 'Jaws (1975)' or the excitement of 'Jurassic Park (1993)'? In other words, where was Spielberg? 4/10

gertjan_kampen 30 March 2018

I wanted to give this movie 4.5 stars but sadly that isn't possible so I am rounding down.

When I first heard news of the synopsis of the movie being leaked and that it was vastly different from the book I hoped they fixed some of the issues the book had. Because even though the book is fun, for it being a book focused on people that actually lived through the 80's it lacks serious depth. I graces the hard issues but never really tackles them (what does being alive mean? Online vs Offline live? What is romance?).

Going into this movie I had hoped they would touch on some of these issues but right from the start things go wrong. It is easy to harp on this movie for not following the book, but at best 2% of the book can be found in this movie. Wades origin story is off. All the challenges have been altered. All he hard hitting moments of sacrifice and taking risks removed. What you are left with is a watered down "spectacle movie" that doesn't make much sense.

Aside from that most of the actual 80's references have been cut. Instead we get pop-culture references (Halo, Gears of War, Track mania, Golden EYE). I can sort of understand why, because they wanted to make it PG13 and the PG13 wouldn't get text based games and 80's references, but it takes away from the entire identity of the book.

The acting is alright although I can't help but feel they completely wasted Simon Pegg's talent. It actually took me a while to even notice he is in the movie all together. All he is is a bland English voice over. A real shame as he normally adds a lot of character to his characters.

Visually the movie is fine. The world outside the Oasis mostly follows the books. The world inside the Oasis is crisp and well rendered. Animations are fluid and facial animations are spot on. This is one of those movies where the 3D is completely tagged on and didn't add anything to the experience however.

Overall I can't praise this movie. It's few clever changes are not enough to save it from mediocrity and the few nostalgia moments will hardly excite the real "nerd". Had they follow the book this movie would have been, like the book, a solid 7/10. As it is now I can't give it above a 4.5/10 in good conscience.

Jared_Andrews 11 April 2018

If you are just looking for a fun movie with expertly directed action sequences, wow moments, and beautiful effects, this is the movie for you. If you are the type of person who cannot help but analyze every movie you see, Ready Player One will cause you some problems.

Spielberg is a master of wow moments. He knows how to capture characters in moments of awe, and he knows how to make the audiences respond with dropped jaws and bewildered expressions. That's why the guy is one of the most financially successful filmmakers of all time. Watching this particular film of his makes it easy to see, even if you weren't already aware of his reputation, that Spielberg works the camera like few others can.

That said, this movie is not perfect.

The premise, at least on its surface, seems wonderful. A teenage boy (Tye Sheridan), named Wade Watts (because it sounds like a superhero's alter ego) in the near future plays an ultra-version of a virtual reality game to escape his grim real-world existence. Everyone in his world does. And we can see why. The VR world (The Oasis) is awesome.

Wade spends his time obsessing over a contest in The Oasis left behind by its now deceased creator. The winner of the contest claims a kajillion dollars (or something like that) and control over The Oasis. With a prize like that, Wade is obviously not the only person trying to win.

So, one day he meets a girl who uses the player name Art3mis (a charming Olivia Cooke) and joins her group. Together they try to win the contest before the evil company does and puts ads in The Oasis (which doesn't seem that bad). Then blah, blah, blah. You can imagine how this all turns out. If not, great, you'll be surprised.

This all seems fine and fun until you dissect the movie even a little bit. The message the movie sends is that this is all about friendship, which is total BS. Friendship is important, sure, but in this world, there is more at stake. Wade and much of the country live in terrible poverty, and a couple mega-businesses control the state of everything. It's a miserable reality with problems that we see today, except amplified by 100.

It's irresponsible and insulting that the movie pretends that this future world will be okay as long as The Oasis doesn't have ads. People still live in poverty. The world is still in shambles.

What I'm saying is, the movie has a problem with stakes. The stakes of this future world are enormous and dire, but the movie chooses to ignore them. That doesn't sit right with me.

One other issue, and this one is minor, is that this movie seems like it's made for kids, but it makes a bunch of 80s nostalgia references. Does that make sense? I don't think today's 14-year-olds care about Duran-Duran.

Even looking past the social blinders this movie chooses to wear and the confusing nostalgia choices, the third act drags horribly. I spaced out for a good ten minutes and didn't miss a thing.

In spite of all that, this movie has moments of ecstasy. If you are going to see, and I'm not sure if you should, see it in a theater. If you can avoid analyzing the movie and simply enjoy it from a pure entertainment standpoint, you may love it.

forrestblaine 7 April 2018

This is the most pandering movie I've ever seen. Nostalgia doesn't make up for an awful and predictable plot, Terrible acting, and Ham-fisted references.

Movie Scene

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